First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Craig JonesFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Charles Gillespie Dr. Jillian Plummer

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Distribution centers (DC) and warehouses are essential for numerous company’s success. These buildings are crucial for a company’s success, whether it is storing their product, shipping to customers, or maintaining inventory. Within these DC’s, thousands of individuals work each day, assisting their employer with processes in certain positions to ensure maximum success for these organizations. Many of these positions are held by lesser-educated individuals, minorities, and especially immigrants. When speaking about those who are “less-educated,” it relates to those who have at maximum a high-school diploma. In certain cases, individuals with some college in their education history can be categorized as “lesser-educated.” A common issue within DC’s for organizations is the thought of increasing automation in order to improve efficiency levels. The development of new technologies within a distribution center, such as human-like robots and automation services, including Radio-Frequency Identification Technology (RFID), have become more integral for success within the supply chain, subtly eliminating the need for jobs for both documented and undocumented immigrants, a backbone that has surrounded the industry for years prior.

College and Major available

Management BS, Marketing BS

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

HN-300-F, Dr. Charles Gillespie and Dr. Jillian Plummer

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Craig Jones

Management and Marketing

Honors Minor

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

The Effect of Enhanced Warehouse Technology on Immigrant Jobs

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Distribution centers (DC) and warehouses are essential for numerous company’s success. These buildings are crucial for a company’s success, whether it is storing their product, shipping to customers, or maintaining inventory. Within these DC’s, thousands of individuals work each day, assisting their employer with processes in certain positions to ensure maximum success for these organizations. Many of these positions are held by lesser-educated individuals, minorities, and especially immigrants. When speaking about those who are “less-educated,” it relates to those who have at maximum a high-school diploma. In certain cases, individuals with some college in their education history can be categorized as “lesser-educated.” A common issue within DC’s for organizations is the thought of increasing automation in order to improve efficiency levels. The development of new technologies within a distribution center, such as human-like robots and automation services, including Radio-Frequency Identification Technology (RFID), have become more integral for success within the supply chain, subtly eliminating the need for jobs for both documented and undocumented immigrants, a backbone that has surrounded the industry for years prior.