First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Sarah DupuisFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Jillian Plummer and Professor Charles Gillespie

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Abstract

The new changes in hospitals that have come in reaction to an increase in maternal opioid use have positively changed the care of infants going through withdrawal. The positive change is for both the benefit of the infant and the benefit of the hospital. By training health care workers to view nonpharmacological treatment as equivalent to medication in the treatment of the infants born with NAS, these newborns will have a speedier recovery that decreases the length that they stay in the hospital. Therefore, by decreasing the infant’s hospital length of stay, hospital costs also decrease. The medical treatments that the infants should be receiving for the treatment of NAS are no longer based on medications themselves. Instead, they are based on a holistic approach allowing the physical and emotional needs of the infant to be met through approaches involving the environment, the quality of sleep and feedings and human contact. In the case of NAS, evidence has guided treatments to a more successful approach and supported the use of nonpharmacological treatment as a replacement for medication.

College and Major available

Nursing BSN

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Honors Capstone, HN-300

Location

Session B: West Campus West Building W223J

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 10:45 AM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 11:45 AM

Students' Information

Sarah Dupuis is a nursing major in the Thomas More Honors Program graduating in May of 2022.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 29th, 10:45 AM Apr 29th, 11:45 AM

Learning to View Nonpharmacological Care as Equivalent to Medications in the Treatment of Babies Born with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Session B: West Campus West Building W223J

The new changes in hospitals that have come in reaction to an increase in maternal opioid use have positively changed the care of infants going through withdrawal. The positive change is for both the benefit of the infant and the benefit of the hospital. By training health care workers to view nonpharmacological treatment as equivalent to medication in the treatment of the infants born with NAS, these newborns will have a speedier recovery that decreases the length that they stay in the hospital. Therefore, by decreasing the infant’s hospital length of stay, hospital costs also decrease. The medical treatments that the infants should be receiving for the treatment of NAS are no longer based on medications themselves. Instead, they are based on a holistic approach allowing the physical and emotional needs of the infant to be met through approaches involving the environment, the quality of sleep and feedings and human contact. In the case of NAS, evidence has guided treatments to a more successful approach and supported the use of nonpharmacological treatment as a replacement for medication.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.