First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Julia LeoneFollow
Emma HigleyFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Jessica Samuolis (Department of Psychology at Sacred Heart University)

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

A number of studies have found that college students have experienced high rates of stress during the pandemic. Despite the high rates of stress among college students, research on students’ use of coping strategies has been mixed. In light of the need to further understand college students’ stress and coping during the COVID-19 pandemic, the current study examined stress and coping strategies during a campus red alert at a mid-sized U.S. university. Data previously collected from an online survey sent out to all undergraduate students 30 days after the COVID-19 red alert status was instituted in the Fall of 2020 was analyzed. The survey included a scale assessing coping strategies as well as a scale assessing perceived stress. A total of 198 students completed these scales. Regression analyses indicated that perceived stress during the red alert status was associated with several maladaptive coping strategies, such as denial, substance use, and behavioral disengagement. Whereas perceived stress was inversely associated with positive coping strategies, such as active coping, planning, and acceptance. Prevention and health promotion efforts on campus should include increased access to the wellness center, coping skills-related informational workshops, and programmatic opportunities that foster social interactions.

College and Major available

Psychology BS

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Research Assistantship PS-397-B, Dr. Jessica Samuolis

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Julia Leone: Psychology major, 2023

Emma Higley: Psychology major, 2023

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

Stress and Coping among College Students during a COVID-19 Red Alert Status on Campus

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

A number of studies have found that college students have experienced high rates of stress during the pandemic. Despite the high rates of stress among college students, research on students’ use of coping strategies has been mixed. In light of the need to further understand college students’ stress and coping during the COVID-19 pandemic, the current study examined stress and coping strategies during a campus red alert at a mid-sized U.S. university. Data previously collected from an online survey sent out to all undergraduate students 30 days after the COVID-19 red alert status was instituted in the Fall of 2020 was analyzed. The survey included a scale assessing coping strategies as well as a scale assessing perceived stress. A total of 198 students completed these scales. Regression analyses indicated that perceived stress during the red alert status was associated with several maladaptive coping strategies, such as denial, substance use, and behavioral disengagement. Whereas perceived stress was inversely associated with positive coping strategies, such as active coping, planning, and acceptance. Prevention and health promotion efforts on campus should include increased access to the wellness center, coping skills-related informational workshops, and programmatic opportunities that foster social interactions.

 

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