First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Naeema KandawalaFollow

Mentor/s

LaTina Steele

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Allelopathic Interactions between Duncanopsammia axifuga and Ulva lactuca

Naeema Kandawala and Dr. LaTina Steele

Biology Department, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT 06825

Abstract

Coral reefs are a diverse and complex ecosystem that provide important food, livelihood, and services. Algae are prominently associated with coral reef degradation. Invasive algae are known to overtake coral-dominated habitats by tactics of poisoning, smothering, and shading, causing a reduction in coral cover. The study was conducted to determine the allelopathic interactions between the ubiquitous macroalga Ulva lactuca and the Indo-Pacific coral Duncanopsammia axifuga. We conducted a lab experiment with a randomized block design with one replicate of each treatment group (control, algae, mimic) in each of five tanks. The study was conducted for a duration of three weeks. The weight and bleached area measurement of D. axifuga were obtained each week. Data were analyzed each week to determine if significant changes in bleaching and weight occurred among treatments. However, only the data from the final week are presented. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significant difference in the change in weight of D. axifuga between the different treatment groups after three weeks. Friedman’s test also revealed no significant difference in the change in percent bleached of D. axifuga between the different treatment groups after three weeks. The findings indicated that there were no allelopathic interactions or effects of physical contact between U. lactuca and D. axifuga. Further studies can help determine algal impacts on coral reef degradation and resilience since some algae produce more potentially allelopathic chemicals than others.

College and Major available

Biology

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

BI-390-L, Supervised Research, LaTina Steele

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Naeema Kandawala - Biology, 2022

Honorable mention, Dean's Prize: College of Arts & Sciences 2022 award.

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

Allelopathic Interactions between Duncanopsammia axifuga and Ulva lactuca

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Allelopathic Interactions between Duncanopsammia axifuga and Ulva lactuca

Naeema Kandawala and Dr. LaTina Steele

Biology Department, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT 06825

Abstract

Coral reefs are a diverse and complex ecosystem that provide important food, livelihood, and services. Algae are prominently associated with coral reef degradation. Invasive algae are known to overtake coral-dominated habitats by tactics of poisoning, smothering, and shading, causing a reduction in coral cover. The study was conducted to determine the allelopathic interactions between the ubiquitous macroalga Ulva lactuca and the Indo-Pacific coral Duncanopsammia axifuga. We conducted a lab experiment with a randomized block design with one replicate of each treatment group (control, algae, mimic) in each of five tanks. The study was conducted for a duration of three weeks. The weight and bleached area measurement of D. axifuga were obtained each week. Data were analyzed each week to determine if significant changes in bleaching and weight occurred among treatments. However, only the data from the final week are presented. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significant difference in the change in weight of D. axifuga between the different treatment groups after three weeks. Friedman’s test also revealed no significant difference in the change in percent bleached of D. axifuga between the different treatment groups after three weeks. The findings indicated that there were no allelopathic interactions or effects of physical contact between U. lactuca and D. axifuga. Further studies can help determine algal impacts on coral reef degradation and resilience since some algae produce more potentially allelopathic chemicals than others.

 

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