First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Molly MartinFollow
Graham TemplemanFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Mattei

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Coastal forests play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity and providing habitats for many species of migratory birds and pollinators. We tested if a closed canopy provided by a restored coastal forest will provide enough shade to reduce the invasive population of mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris). Mugwort has little value to wildlife as it’s pollen and tiny seeds are wind dispersed. It grows densely and frequently out competes native plant species. Native tree and shrub species were planted close together (~1m apart) in 2017 and 2019 on a remediated site in Stratford, Connecticut. The 0.52 ha area was covered with mugwort in 2017 and mowed; the native trees and shrubs came in 3-gallon containers from a local nursery. By 2022, approximately 0.39 ha is covered with tree and shrub canopy. Thus, 75% of the forest area is populated with native species instead of mugwort. This restoration has significantly decreased the population of mugwort to only 25% of the area. We also observed an increase in pollinating insects and this small patch of coastal forest serves as a stopover site for migrating passerines. Restoration of coastal forests and reduction of invasive plants can be accomplished in four years with highly dense plantings.

College and Major available

Biology

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

BI-378, Dr. Mattei

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Molly Martin, Biology, Honors, 2022

Graham Templeman, Biology, 2023

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

Does Native Plant Density Matter for Coastal/shrub Habitat Restoration in the Presence of Non-native Invasive Species?

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Coastal forests play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity and providing habitats for many species of migratory birds and pollinators. We tested if a closed canopy provided by a restored coastal forest will provide enough shade to reduce the invasive population of mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris). Mugwort has little value to wildlife as it’s pollen and tiny seeds are wind dispersed. It grows densely and frequently out competes native plant species. Native tree and shrub species were planted close together (~1m apart) in 2017 and 2019 on a remediated site in Stratford, Connecticut. The 0.52 ha area was covered with mugwort in 2017 and mowed; the native trees and shrubs came in 3-gallon containers from a local nursery. By 2022, approximately 0.39 ha is covered with tree and shrub canopy. Thus, 75% of the forest area is populated with native species instead of mugwort. This restoration has significantly decreased the population of mugwort to only 25% of the area. We also observed an increase in pollinating insects and this small patch of coastal forest serves as a stopover site for migrating passerines. Restoration of coastal forests and reduction of invasive plants can be accomplished in four years with highly dense plantings.

 

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