First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Anna KleinFollow
Nicole GuidiFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Jennifer Mattei

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

We are living in the Anthropocene, the age of human domination, no habitat on earth has been untouched by human activity. Thus, over half of pollinator populations and one quarter of wildflower populations have been lost. Pollinators are crucial for maintaining biodiversity and our agricultural products. Meadow restoration is imperative but difficult. We tested the idea of restoring 4 acres of meadow in Stratford, Connecticut, to help increase our native pollinators by using seed mixes with 42 wildflower species. After remediation, the land was tilled and seeded in December 2015 with 30 pounds of native wildflower seed mix from Ernst Seed Company. These mixes include: PA Coastal Plain Meadow Mix, Xerces Northeastern Pollinator Mix, Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden Mix, Deer Resistant Meadow Mix, Northeast Native Wildflower Mix. Of the 42 species used to seed the area, only 14 remained in the meadow by the third year after seeding (2018). Twenty-three species not originally seeded came in from adjacent areas. By 2021, mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) dominates the site at ~80% cover. Every August, mugwort will require cutting and pulling from these areas. Keeping large wildflower meadows free from invasive, non-native plant species is expensive and time consuming.

College and Major available

Biology

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Restoration Ecology BI-378-A

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Anna Klein

Major: biology

Minor: chemistry, honors

Graduation year: 2022

Nicole Guidi

Major: biology

Minor: chemistry, honors

Graduation year: 2022

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COinS
 
Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) Prevents Meadow Restoration, Deepening the Pollinator Crisis

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

We are living in the Anthropocene, the age of human domination, no habitat on earth has been untouched by human activity. Thus, over half of pollinator populations and one quarter of wildflower populations have been lost. Pollinators are crucial for maintaining biodiversity and our agricultural products. Meadow restoration is imperative but difficult. We tested the idea of restoring 4 acres of meadow in Stratford, Connecticut, to help increase our native pollinators by using seed mixes with 42 wildflower species. After remediation, the land was tilled and seeded in December 2015 with 30 pounds of native wildflower seed mix from Ernst Seed Company. These mixes include: PA Coastal Plain Meadow Mix, Xerces Northeastern Pollinator Mix, Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden Mix, Deer Resistant Meadow Mix, Northeast Native Wildflower Mix. Of the 42 species used to seed the area, only 14 remained in the meadow by the third year after seeding (2018). Twenty-three species not originally seeded came in from adjacent areas. By 2021, mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) dominates the site at ~80% cover. Every August, mugwort will require cutting and pulling from these areas. Keeping large wildflower meadows free from invasive, non-native plant species is expensive and time consuming.

 

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