Mentor/s

Michael T. Vale, PhD

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Ageism refers to the combined stereotypes, prejudice, and discriminatory behaviors based on someone’s presumed age. Older adults are viewed with mixed (ambivalent) perceptions, such that they are viewed as being warm, but not very capable. Thus, there are multiple forms of ageism. Hostile ageism refers to the overtly negative ageism, whereas benevolent ageism refers to the seemingly kind form of ageism that still reinforces negative stereotypes (e.g., giving your seat to someone, assuming they are fragile or weak). Most research on ageism has referred to attitudes, both inter-and intra-group, directed toward older adults and aging. This work has found that hostile attitudes and views of aging predict worse health and well-being, totaling a cost of up to $63 billion per year (Levy et al., 2020). However, little research has examined how ageism is experienced across a lifespan sample (younger, middle aged, and older adults) and presently no current research has examined how ageism is experienced in a daily diary method. The goal of our research is to create a way to measure daily experiences of ageism to use in a future daily diary study.

College and Major available

Psychology BS

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus 2nd Floor University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-28-2023 12:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-28-2023 2:00 PM

Students' Information

Francesca L. Davenport: Sophomore (25), Psychology

Angelina M. Wargo: Junior (24), Psychology

Angela C. White: Senior (23), Psychology

Ava K. Bjelka: Sophomore (25), Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 PM Apr 28th, 2:00 PM

You Look So Good for Your Age: First Steps of Creating a Measure of Daily Experiences of Ageism

Digital Commons & West Campus 2nd Floor University Commons

Ageism refers to the combined stereotypes, prejudice, and discriminatory behaviors based on someone’s presumed age. Older adults are viewed with mixed (ambivalent) perceptions, such that they are viewed as being warm, but not very capable. Thus, there are multiple forms of ageism. Hostile ageism refers to the overtly negative ageism, whereas benevolent ageism refers to the seemingly kind form of ageism that still reinforces negative stereotypes (e.g., giving your seat to someone, assuming they are fragile or weak). Most research on ageism has referred to attitudes, both inter-and intra-group, directed toward older adults and aging. This work has found that hostile attitudes and views of aging predict worse health and well-being, totaling a cost of up to $63 billion per year (Levy et al., 2020). However, little research has examined how ageism is experienced across a lifespan sample (younger, middle aged, and older adults) and presently no current research has examined how ageism is experienced in a daily diary method. The goal of our research is to create a way to measure daily experiences of ageism to use in a future daily diary study.

 

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