Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2020

Abstract

Background: Sports- and recreation-related (SRR) activities are a major cause of adolescent concussions. Most adolescent SRR concussion research has been conducted among public school students. As private schools are qualitatively different from public schools (eg, location, socioeconomic status, sports played), this study explores the concussion experiences of a large group of private high school students. Methods: We surveyed 2047 New England private preparatory high school students who played sports or engaged in a recreational activity in 2018 about the sports they played, and their self-reported concussion experiences (eg, age at first concussion, if concussions were sports- or recreation-related). Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistics are presented. Results: One-third (33.0%) of students who reported engaging in sport- or recreation-related activities self-reported experiencing a concussion in their lifetime. A higher percentage of boys, students who played contact sports, and those who played multiple seasons of school sports reported a concussion. Sex, contact level of primary sport played, and age of first concussion were also significantly associated with reporting a sports- or recreation-related concussion. Conclusions: A sizeable proportion of private preparatory high school students reported experiencing a concussion, with some students at higher risk. Private preparatory high school-specific concussion prevention strategies may be needed.

Comments

Jason Bouton is an adjunct professor in the Athletic Training program at Sacred Heart University.

Published 2020. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

DOI

10.1111/josh.12899

PMID

32369871

Publication

Journal of School Health

Publisher

Wiley

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.