Title

Agreement and Reliability of Median Neurodynamic Test 1 and Resting Scapular Position

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

12-2020

Abstract

Objective

The purposes of this study were to determine whether there are differences between the dominant and nondominant arms for the Median Neurodynamic Test 1 (MNT 1); whether there are differences between men and women on the MNT 1; the reliability of an assessment of resting scapular position; the reliability of the MNT 1; and the frequency and percentage of sensory responses that are present during the MNT 1 in the asymptomatic population.

Methods

This was a reliability and agreement study. It included asymptomatic students enrolled in the college of health professions and the college of nursing at a university. The Mann–Whitney U was used to determine whether there were any differences between the dominant and nondominant sides and between sexes for elbow extension range of motion and for sensory responses on the numeric pain rating scale when performing the MNT 1. A χ2 analysis was used to determine whether there were any differences between sexes and between dominant and nondominant upper extremities for sensory-response location, sensory-response type, and structural differentiation for raters 1 and 2. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,3) was used to determine the intertester and intratester reliability for the degrees of elbow extension attained during testing.

Results

Reliability for degrees of elbow extension and strength of the sensory response was excellent (ICC2,3 ˃ 0.75) and substantial (κ ≥ 0.68), respectively. Resting scapular position and all other components of the MNT 1 demonstrated statistically significant side-to-side differences and κ values ranging from 0.23 to 0.88.

Conclusion

Elbow extension and magnitude of sensory response are reliable components of the MNT 1 that are not different between the dominant and nondominant sides in the asymptomatic population.

Comments

Kylie Calandra, Kelsey Foster, Melissa Peet, and Matthew Walsh are students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Sacred Heart University.

DOI

10.1016/j.jcm.2020.09.002

PMID

33536857

Publication

Journal of Chiropractic Medicine

Volume

19

Issue

4

Publisher

Elsevier

Pages

203-212


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