Title

An Examination of Electronic Nicotine Delivery System Use Among College Students Using Social Cognitive Theory

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2020

Abstract

Using social cognitive theory as a framework, this study examined electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use, related cognitions, and context among college students. Participants: Respondents were 1229 students attending a mid-sized, northeastern university. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was administered and SPSS was used for analysis. Results: Almost 41% of respondents reported ENDS use in the prior month (past-month user), 26.8% reported trying ENDS but no use in the prior month (occasional user), and 32.3% reported never trying ENDS. The results highlight significant associations in past-month versus occasional use and reasons for initiation, location for ENDS use, perceived norms for ENDS use, and outcome expectations for ENDS use. Conclusions: This study highlights a need for theory-based, multi-level strategies to reduce ENDS use. Interventions should increase awareness about the risks of ENDS, include peer-based interventions to foster health-promoting campus social environments, and explore the use of policies restricting campus ENDS use.

Comments

Published online: 30 Nov 2020.

When the article was researched and written Gabrielle Diaz was a student in the MPH program; Julianna Merighi was a student in the Exercise Science program; Patrick Mahoney was a student in the Department of Biology.

DOI

10.1080/07448481.2020.1835922

PMID

33253007

Publication

Journal of American College Health

Publisher

Taylor & Francis


Share

COinS