First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Katherine MeyerFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Michelle Cole

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome (MALS) is a rare condition caused by the median arcuate ligament compressing the celiac plexus. Families are challenged to find reliable information about MALS, its treatment, and what to expect after medical intervention. At Stamford hospital, patients admitted to the pediatrics floor after MALS surgery are typically between the ages of 11 and 17. They speak English or Spanish, are literate, and are accompanied by at least one family member. This poster describes the creation a patient oriented educational tool with relevant information about MALS, surgery, and recovery that reflects individual, family, and community values. Sections of the brochure are targeted to the pediatric patients and other sections address the questions families may have. A section, in Spanish, directs Spanish speakers to additional culturally competent resources.

College and Major available

Nursing BSN

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Transition Into Professional Nursing

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2020 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2020 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Katherine Meyer, nursing major, honors student, 2020

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome (MALS) Explained

Digital Commons

Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome (MALS) is a rare condition caused by the median arcuate ligament compressing the celiac plexus. Families are challenged to find reliable information about MALS, its treatment, and what to expect after medical intervention. At Stamford hospital, patients admitted to the pediatrics floor after MALS surgery are typically between the ages of 11 and 17. They speak English or Spanish, are literate, and are accompanied by at least one family member. This poster describes the creation a patient oriented educational tool with relevant information about MALS, surgery, and recovery that reflects individual, family, and community values. Sections of the brochure are targeted to the pediatric patients and other sections address the questions families may have. A section, in Spanish, directs Spanish speakers to additional culturally competent resources.