First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Abigail LarsonFollow

Mentor/s

Prof. Adrienne Crowell and Dr. Anna Vaughn

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Abstract

Horticultural therapy (HT) is best defined as the use of plants and plant-based activities with a goal of rehabilitation and healing oneself (Rutgers, n.d.). While the benefits have been known for decades through research with war veterans and elderly people in nursing homes, recent studies have been exploring the assets it can provide for prison populations. Prisons in the US are notorious for their bad conditions, including shortages of mental health treatment, high costs, and lack of access to fresh fruits and vegetables for the inmates. If such a thing exists that can provide a solution for all of these problems, then it should be implemented. While the full extent is not known, HT programs have been shown as a potential answer. HT programs have been shown to benefit the mental health of those in prison by decreasing depression and anxiety, as well as promoting openness and a nonjudgmental setting by using plants as a common ground (Lee, 2021; Jiler, 2006; Devine-Wright et al., 2019; Richards & Kafami, 2019). Additionally, to negate any issues in regard to budgeting, HT programs have been shown to be cost effective and pay for themselves within a few years (Jiler, 2006; Holmes & Walkiczek, 2019; Devine-Wright et al., 2019). Lastly, these programs are able to give inmates access to healthy fruits and vegetables that can improve both their mental and physical health (Devine-Wright et al., 2019; Jiler, 2006). Since these benefits have been found with the limited studies that have been done, more effort needs to go into exploring the full benefits of HT programs in prisons and should be implemented more frequently across the US.

College and Major available

Criminal Justice, Psychology BS

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

HN-300-L Professor Anna Vaughn and Professor Adrienne Crowell

Location

Session C: West Campus West Building W112

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 10:45 AM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 11:45 AM

Students' Information

Abigail Larson- Criminal Justice and Psychology Majors, Honors student, 2023 graduation

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Apr 29th, 10:45 AM Apr 29th, 11:45 AM

Horticultural Therapy in Prison Populations

Session C: West Campus West Building W112

Horticultural therapy (HT) is best defined as the use of plants and plant-based activities with a goal of rehabilitation and healing oneself (Rutgers, n.d.). While the benefits have been known for decades through research with war veterans and elderly people in nursing homes, recent studies have been exploring the assets it can provide for prison populations. Prisons in the US are notorious for their bad conditions, including shortages of mental health treatment, high costs, and lack of access to fresh fruits and vegetables for the inmates. If such a thing exists that can provide a solution for all of these problems, then it should be implemented. While the full extent is not known, HT programs have been shown as a potential answer. HT programs have been shown to benefit the mental health of those in prison by decreasing depression and anxiety, as well as promoting openness and a nonjudgmental setting by using plants as a common ground (Lee, 2021; Jiler, 2006; Devine-Wright et al., 2019; Richards & Kafami, 2019). Additionally, to negate any issues in regard to budgeting, HT programs have been shown to be cost effective and pay for themselves within a few years (Jiler, 2006; Holmes & Walkiczek, 2019; Devine-Wright et al., 2019). Lastly, these programs are able to give inmates access to healthy fruits and vegetables that can improve both their mental and physical health (Devine-Wright et al., 2019; Jiler, 2006). Since these benefits have been found with the limited studies that have been done, more effort needs to go into exploring the full benefits of HT programs in prisons and should be implemented more frequently across the US.

 

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