First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Isabella RoglerFollow

Mentor/s

Matthew F. Moran, Ph.D.

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The spring-mass model explains the way one’s center of mass (COM) fluctuates during running gait. The ‘spring’ represents the structures of the leg that undergo compression and rebound during the stance phase of running. At initial foot contact, the spring compresses and the COM lowers to its maximally compressed state.1 Measurements are taken at the maximally compressed state and the most superior COM position.2 The vertical displacement of the center of mass in running is known as vertical oscillation (VO).

PURPOSE: To develop norms with marker-less motion capture (MLMC) and assess the reliability of measuring VO with MLMC.

METHODS: Twenty-one college-aged runners had to fulfill a set of requirements and grant informed consent before beginning the study. All procedures were approved by the University’s Institutional Review Board. Participants committed to coming on there distinct days and run for a total of six minutes at three self-selected speeds. Data was collected using the Phystread Pressure Treadmill and Sony RX0 II cameras.

RESULTS: The intracclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated using JASP Software and was computed to be 0.909. The mean VO was 8.99 (±) 1.34. Standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change were calculated using MS Excel software and found to be 0.293 cm and 0.959 cm, respectively.

DISCUSSION: Our findings demonstrated that the Theia3D MLMC system was able to reliably measure VO for the twenty-one participants. The intracclass correlation coefficient (ICC) indicated excellent reliability, demonstrating that this technology can accurately measure VO. More research must be completed to determine the implications of how VO can be altered in gait retraining and potential benefits.

College and Major available

Exercise Science BS

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus 2nd Floor University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-28-2023 12:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-28-2023 2:00 PM

Students' Information

Isabella Rogler, Exercise Science, Honors, 2023

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 12:00 PM Apr 28th, 2:00 PM

Exploration of Vertical Oscillation During Running Using Marker-less Motion Capture

Digital Commons & West Campus 2nd Floor University Commons

INTRODUCTION: The spring-mass model explains the way one’s center of mass (COM) fluctuates during running gait. The ‘spring’ represents the structures of the leg that undergo compression and rebound during the stance phase of running. At initial foot contact, the spring compresses and the COM lowers to its maximally compressed state.1 Measurements are taken at the maximally compressed state and the most superior COM position.2 The vertical displacement of the center of mass in running is known as vertical oscillation (VO).

PURPOSE: To develop norms with marker-less motion capture (MLMC) and assess the reliability of measuring VO with MLMC.

METHODS: Twenty-one college-aged runners had to fulfill a set of requirements and grant informed consent before beginning the study. All procedures were approved by the University’s Institutional Review Board. Participants committed to coming on there distinct days and run for a total of six minutes at three self-selected speeds. Data was collected using the Phystread Pressure Treadmill and Sony RX0 II cameras.

RESULTS: The intracclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated using JASP Software and was computed to be 0.909. The mean VO was 8.99 (±) 1.34. Standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change were calculated using MS Excel software and found to be 0.293 cm and 0.959 cm, respectively.

DISCUSSION: Our findings demonstrated that the Theia3D MLMC system was able to reliably measure VO for the twenty-one participants. The intracclass correlation coefficient (ICC) indicated excellent reliability, demonstrating that this technology can accurately measure VO. More research must be completed to determine the implications of how VO can be altered in gait retraining and potential benefits.